Useful Tips for your trip to Bali

Useful Tips for your trip to Bali

Here is a useful list of ‘Things you should know before you go’ compiled by several travellers who wished they had it on their first trip. To avoid experiencing those ‘First Time in Bali’ classic mistakes, scan this page and in only 5 minutes you will be a little more prepared for your Bali holidays! To make it even more useful we added some basic information you will also find handy before and during your trip. We have split the information into categories so you can find the information you need quickly and easily. These tips are often quite basic and easy to follow, but when added together they can make a huge difference to your first experience of Bali.
 
Getting to Bali 1) VISA: Nationals of 169 countries can visit Bali visa-free (for 30 days), while Visa on Arrival applies for others at USD 35 (extendable once). 2) WEATHER: Wet season: October-April; Dry season: May-September; Best time to go: May-August. 3) SPECIAL DAYS: No travel during Saka New Year, aka ‘Nyepi’ (usually coincides March – specific dates vary every year based on the Saka lunar calendar).

Taxis in Bali are easily your most viable choice for getting around the island, due to their wide availability and convenience. Within Bali’s most popular resort areas, especially in the southern area, it is easy as getting by a roadside and simply flagging one down. Some operators are known for their reliability and for regularly updating their fleet with the latest car models. Generally, all taxis get you to your intended destination in comfort and in time, and are actually the safest way to get around. When asked for, Bali taxis are also easy to call from your hotel front desk, or information counters at major shopping malls, restaurants and venues. Most are metered. Some also have English-speaking operators, making it easy to call from your own mobile phone. Starting fares are at IDR 7,500 then go for IDR 4,000-5,000 (approximately US 40 cents) per kilometre. Typical transfer fares for a few kilometres, say from Kuta to Jimbaran, ranges between IDR 50,000-75,000. Here are some useful tips and good things to know about taxis in Bali.

Taxis in Bali are easily your most viable choice for getting around the island, due to their wide availability and convenience. Within Bali’s most popular resort areas, especially in the southern area, it is easy as getting by a roadside and simply flagging one down. Some operators are known for their reliability and for regularly updating their fleet with the latest car models. Generally, all taxis get you to your intended destination in comfort and in time, and are actually the safest way to get around. When asked for, Bali taxis are also easy to call from your hotel front desk, or information counters at major shopping malls, restaurants and venues. Most are metered. Some also have English-speaking operators, making it easy to call from your own mobile phone. Starting fares are at IDR 7,500 then go for IDR 4,000-5,000 (approximately US 40 cents) per kilometre. Typical transfer fares for a few kilometres, say from Kuta to Jimbaran, ranges between IDR 50,000-75,000. Here are some useful tips and good things to know about taxis in Bali.

 

 

My Love for Paris

My Love for Paris

I have loved travel for as long as I can remember. My parents instilled that in me at a very young age. Our summers, and a lot of our weekends, were spent travelling in our RV. We did a lot of local trips here in Alberta but also went on some long haul journeys. We drove to Alaska, across Canada, and to Southern California, just to name a few. I loved seeing new places and learning about the history and culture. Social Studies was always my favourite subject in school.

The travel bug bit me hard in eleventh grade, when I took my first trip to Europe. It was a school trip and the first time I had ever been on a plane (I was so nervous!) We started in London and made our way down to Paris. And then I fell in love. Not puppy-dog, high school love. This was true love. The kind of love that consumes you, that pains you to be away from. The kind of love that lasts forever.

Was I in love with Paris? Oh yes! But more so, I was in love with the entire experience of travelling. I could not get enough. I wanted to see as much as I could, learn as much as I could, make the most of every minute. Travelling by bus, I would look around and see people sleeping and think, What is wrong with you people! You are missing out! I even enjoyed simple landscapes as they were fleeting past my window.

I tend to prefer travelling independently to places that have a mix of beautiful landscapes and historic sites. I love to visit archaeological sites and spend time outdoors hiking, biking, and boating. It’s really hard to convince me to go to a beach somewhere and do nothing but lay around for a week. I can handle maybe a day or two, but after that I need to get active and go out exploring! I also crave to see a country in depth. I am not a fan of the 10 countries in 10 days type of tours (I hate feeling rushed and missing out on places). And budget travel isn’t my thing either. I like a little bit of luxury at the end of the day!

 

My trip to Japan

My trip to Japan

We spent our last days visiting with family and friends, and biking around the area.

I was able to meet with a former student and his family on Saturday. I had not seen Yusuke since he was 7! We had lunch, went for a long walk, and reminisced…

We celebrated my niece’s first birthday with her family, including her grandmother, aunt, and cousin. I made the birthday cake…

On Sunday afternoon, we all went to a beer fest at the farmer’s market in Ome, where Dianne’s friends had a T-shirt booth. Bill bought one…

We took a 16 mile ride with my brother on Monday, up into the mountains near his house. The ride included several miles on a main road frequented by the dreaded dump trucks, but we survived! We went into a small mountain village where we turned around and started the much easier ride back home. We had hoped to stop for lunch at our favorite tofu place along the river, but it was closed